SOWQU

Directions:

In the first part, each question should be answered in one detailed and fully developed paragraph. Be brief but descriptive and analytical, using 5-7 sentences in each paragraph. Use quotes from readings and book to support your thoughts when possible. Make sure you explain why you thought the in text citations you chose were important.

In the second part, explain the quote as applied to the book, State of Wonder by Ann Patchett as completely as possible.

Part 1

1. After completing the reading of this book, what were your thoughts about the title? Please especially consider the possible meanings of “state” and “wonder”.

1. Marina Singh was the leading protagonist in this novel. What did you think about her character in both positive and negative ways. Do you think she was transformed in any way by her time in the jungle?

1. Although represented in a fictional manner, Pharma is at the center of this novel. What did you think about its narrative function in this text? Another way of looking at pharmaceutical industries is through the lens of research and development. What do you think about these areas as part of globalization?

1. Even though the Patchett book took place in current times, it had a certain colonial flavor. What connections were there between colonization processes and modern pharmaceutical ones?

1. The notions of space and place were apparent in this text. How did you perceive these aspects regarding the geographical locations of Minnesota and Manaus?

1. The areas of identity, uncertainty and belonging were interesting parts of this book and Marina’s personality. How did they manifest themselves in the story?

1. What were your thoughts about the relationship between Mr. Fox and Marina?

1. Indigenous people were prominently featured in this book. What are your thoughts about using them in research and development? Should women have children at an “advanced biological age”?

1. How are the following all intertwined: characteristics pertaining to the environment, the field of ethics, and the world of globalization?

1. We do not know what will actually become of Marina in the future. What do you think might happen to her?

Part 2

Explain each of the following quotes.

1. Dr. Swenson states, “the question is whether or not you choose to disturb the world around you, or if you choose to go on as if you had never arrived. That is how one respects indigenous people…The point is to observe the life they themselves have put into place and learn from it.”

1. Dr. Swenson believes, ‘that it is difficult to trust yourself in the jungle…Some people gain their bearings over time but for others the adjustment never comes.”

1. It has been said that “sesta” (afternoon nap) is one of the only gifts the Europeans (Portuguese) brought to South America, but I imagine the Brazilians could have figured out how to sleep in the afternoon without having had to endure centuries of murder and enslavement.”

1. “Never be so focused on what you’re looking for that you overlook the thing you actually find.”

1. Ann Patchett has stated, “Reading fiction not only develops our imagination and creativity, it gives us the skills to be alone. It gives us the ability to feel empathy for people we’ve never met, living lives we couldn’t possibly experience for ourselves.” How does this quote apply to State of Wonder and your reading of this novel?

Discussion Questions

150 words (1-7)

1. To what extent have you noticed a shift in how people in your life think and talk about diversity in sexuality and gender?  To what do you attribute this?

2. How can schools and teachers be more inclusive and supportive of LGBTQ students? What will you do in your classroom?

3. What would you do in an instance in which an LGBTQ student has a parent who is unaccepting of them?

4. In what ways does Cass’s Gay Identity Development Stages help you consider how you would support and talk about LGBTQ students? Cite the stage in your response.

5. What are the potential challenges of being a teacher who identifies as LGBTQ?  What are the potential strengths in supporting LGBTQ students?

6. To what extent have you noticed a shift in school policies and practices related to sexuality and gender? To what do you attribute this?

7. What is challenging for teachers about supporting LGBTQ students?

200 words (1-2)

1. Scenario Part 1:

You arrived at your classroom and the seating in the classroom is so close to the doorway that it is congested, the chairs are disorganized, newspapers are strewn around, and papers are on the floor. The normal furniture is not in the classroom. The window are uneven. It’s a cold winter morning and the windows are opened, making the room very cold. People in the classroom next door are having a loud role play exercise.  Your teacher arrives barely on time or a little late, looking clearly flustered and notices that the lectern is not there and that he needs to get one. He left the room and retrieve the lectern. He started a PowerPoint and apologized that it is the wrong one.  He also distributed a handout and there are clearly not enough copies for everyone.  Focus on the following point:

•   You arrive in the classroom 3 minutes early.  What would you do to bring order to the situation on you own? Why do you do it?

2. Scenario Part 2:

You arrived at your classroom and the seating in the classroom is so close to the doorway that it is congested, the chairs are disorganized, newspapers are strewn around, and papers are on the floor. The normal furniture is not in the classroom. The window are uneven. It’s a cold winter morning and the windows are opened, making the room very cold. People in the classroom next door are having a loud role play exercise.  Your teacher arrives barely on time or a little late, looking clearly flustered and notices that the lectern is not there and that he needs to get one. He left the room and retrieve the lectern. He started a PowerPoint and apologized that it is the wrong one.  He also distributed a handout and there are clearly not enough copies for everyone.  Focus on the following point:

Discuss the impact this scenario would have on the emotions of your students?

LGTBQ

Ahile anyone can be sexu-ally assaulted in detention, transgender inmates are ex-ceptionally vulnerable to this form of violence. One study of California prisoners found that 59 percent of trans- gender women housed in men’s prisons had been sexually abused while incarcerat- ed, as compared to 4 percent of non-trans- gender inmates in men’s prisons.1 Making matters worse, transgender inmates often face prejudice and discrimination in the aftermath of an assault.

The Basics about the Transgender Community

People who are transgender have a gender identity that is different from their as- signed sex at birth. Everyone has a gender identity – a sense of being male or female (and for some, neither male nor female). A transgender woman is someone who was identified as male at birth but whose gen- der identity is female and lives, or desires to live, her life as a woman. A transgender man is someone who was identified as fe- male at birth but whose gender identity is male and lives, or desires to live, his life as a man. Gender identity and sexual orien- tation are not the same thing – a trans- gender person may identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or heterosexual.

The federal government and almost every state recognize transgender people’s right to change their name and to have identifi- cation documents with the gender marker

that matches their gender identity.2 Despite that right, grave misconceptions about what it means to be transgender are common, in detention facilities and in society as a whole. Some think that transgender people’s “true” sex or gender is the one they were assigned at birth. Others believe that transgender people only become “real men” or “real women” after they have had surgery, failing to recognize that each person transitions in their own way and that someone’s gender identity always is that person’s “true” gender.

Most transgender people face discrimination. Many are rejected by their families, denied housing, and verbally abused simply for be- ing themselves. Transgender people also have a very hard time finding a job; employ- ment discrimination forces many to become involved in the street economy and in sur- vival crime.3 Widespread bias and ignorance among law enforcement and other officials mean that transgender people are dispro- portionately subjected to arrest and, in turn, imprisonment.4

Transgender People in Detention

In most cases, corrections agencies make gender classifications based on genitalia and not a person’s gender identity. As such, trans- gender women are held in men’s facilities and called “he”; transgender men are held in women’s facilities and called “she.”5

Transgender inmates face unique challenges and extreme danger, fuelled by hostile and ill- informed notions among officials and prison-

Targets for Abuse: Transgender Inmates and Prisoner Rape

march 2013

just detention international march 2013 | fact sheet

“My rape crisis counselor was the first person to see me as a woman, apart from the people who wanted to abuse me.”

— Michelle, a transgender survivor of sexual abuse behind bars

WTwo transgender women inmates in a men’s jail. © Axel Koester/Corbis

2

fact sheet

Seek out an appropriate advocacy orga- nization and request training for your staff. The membership list of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Projects is a good place to start for regional resources: www.ncavp.org/AVPs/default.aspx.

Remember that transgender detainees have likely faced significant discrimina- tion, harassment, and violence before they contact you, and that they may fear the same reaction from your agency.

Listen carefully and use the same language as the client for pronouns, relationships, and names. The words that transgender people use to describe themselves vary, but you should use their language. If in doubt, be comfortable asking simple, clar- ifying questions – transgender people, as other clients, will appreciate your candor.

Do not let a mistake in your language stop you from helping the survivor. Apologize and continue to offer help.

Respect the privacy of transgender peo- ple. Only ask questions about his or her body and medical history if it is necessary for your crisis counseling.

Tips for Advocatesers alike. In many cases, the gender identity of transgender inmates is simply ignored and they are denied gender-appropriate clothing and hygiene products. Because transgender women are typically housed in men’s facili- ties, they often have to shower and change their clothes in front of male inmates and staff. Once targeted for abuse, the majority of transgender survivors are subjected to re- peated sexual assaults.6

Transgender inmates are frequently unable to get the health care they need, especially care related to their gender transition, resulting in significant medical and emotional problems. Many are also cut off from the outside world, as visitation policies in prisons and jails typi- cally do not recognize transgender inmates’ chosen families as relatives. For those who al- ready have been rejected by their birth fami- lies, such policies can lead to an acute sense of isolation.

The health and wellbeing of transgender in- mates is further affected by relentless verbal abuse by staff and other inmates. Sexual abuse thrives in prisons and jails in which staff al- low, or participate in, the degradation of in- mates on the basis of their gender identity. Widespread use of epithets creates a hostile environment for transgender people and any- one who is gender non-conforming. Because of their masculine appearance, transgender men (and gender non-conforming women)

held in women’s facilities are often incorrect- ly identified as safety threats or aggressors. When transgender inmates report sexual violence they are frequently blamed for the abuse by staff members, who may feel that transgender inmates deserve to be victim- ized, that they “are asking for it.”

In many facilities, officials have a stand- ing policy to house transgender inmates in solitary confinement, either as soon as they enter a facility or after they have been sexu- ally assaulted. Sometimes officials make such housing decisions in an attempt to protect transgender people; other times the isolation itself is used as a form of abuse. Regardless of the intent, solitary confinement causes sig- nificant emotional distress. Inmates who are locked down in a tiny cell for 23 hours a day are cut off from vital services and programs. Not surprisingly, many transgender rape sur- vivors suffer in silence, afraid that speaking out will result in isolation.

Because of the unique challenges facing transgender inmates, and their extreme vul- nerability to sexual violence, rape crisis ser- vice providers play a particularly important role in promoting their health. As Michelle described in the opening quote, counselors are sometimes the only people who will treat transgender detainees with respect, recognize their gender identity as their true gender, and care about their safety.7

Endnotes 1Valerie Jenness et al., Violence in California Correctional Facilities: An Empirical Examination of Sexual Assault (Irvine: Center for Evidence-Based Corrections, University of California, 2007), 3. 2 Jami Kathleen Taylor, “Transgender Identities and Public Policy in the United States: The Relevance for Public Administration,” Administration & Society vol. 39 (2007): 837-8. 3 In a recent survey, the percentage of transgender people who were unemployed was double that of the national average. See Jaime M. Grant et al., Injustice at Every Turn A Report of the National: Transgender Discrimination Survey (Washington: National Center for Transgender Equality and National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, 2011), 55. 4 Ibid., 158. 5 More information about transgender people can be found in JDI’s forthcoming Advocate’s Manual (due in 2013). 6 For first-person testimony from transgender survivors, visit JDI’s website: www.justdetention.org; such ac- counts of abuse can also be found in a joint report by JDI and the ACLU National Prison Project, Still in Danger: The Ongoing Threat of Sexual Violence against Transgender Prisoners (Los Angeles: 2005), 6. 7 For more information on new protections for transgender detainees required by the Prison Rape Elimination Act, see JDI’s factsheet, The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Standards: An Overview for Community Service Providers, 2013.

This project is supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K100, awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this document are those of Just Detention International and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

Headquarters 3325 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 340 Los Angeles, CA 90010 Tel: (213) 384-1400 Fax: (213) 384-1411

east Coast offiCe

1900 L Street NW, Suite 601 Washington, DC 20036 Tel: (202) 506-3333 Fax: (202) 506-7971

info@justdetention.org www.justdetention.org

just detention international march 2013 | fact sheet

Just detention international is a health and human rights orga- nization that seeks to end sexual abuse in all forms of detention.

LGTBQ

How We Got Gay (Full Documentary)

Law Enforcement and the Transgender Community – CRS Roll Call Training Video

Law Enforcement and the Transgender Community – CRS Training Program

How Did You Realise You Were Nonbinary?

Gender Identity & The Brain

https://charlierose.com/videos/21056

Gavin Grimm’s Story | Gender Revolution

SDPD Officer: ‘I’m Transgender’

Transgender woman attacked in bar

Carpenter Vs United States

Running head: CARPENTER Vs. UNITED STATES 1

CARPENTER Vs. UNITED STATES 4

Carpenter Vs United States

Student’s Name

Institutional Affiliation

Carpenter Vs United States

Case Summary

Four men who were linked to a series of robberies at RadioShack and T-Mobile stores in Michigan and Ohio were arrested by police in April 2011. During the arrest, one of the suspects confessed to the crimes. He surrendered his phone number to the police together with that of other participants. This information was used by the FBI who sought from the court orders to access the transactional documents on every phone number, to which they were permitted within the storage under the communications Act, 2703 (d) of the U.S. constitution, 1994 (Fonzone et al., 2018). Among the suspects, Timothy Carpenter’s number had been provided to the law enforcement and as a result, his records were obtained.

Based on the Act, the government might demand for the disclosure of some specific telecommunications records where there is a reasonable ground to trust that the content pursued for is appropriate and material to a continuous criminal enquiry. Apparently, the material sought for by the prosecutors included the cell-site location information and the time-stamped record for the connections to the networks (Fonzone et al., 2018). While using the evidence from the cell-site, Timothy Carpenter was charged by the government for abetting and aiding robbery, among other offenses, that impacted interstate entrepreneur activity in desecration with the Hobbs Act, 18 U.S.C, 1951.Later, he was sentenced to 100 years in prison.

Appeal

On his appeal against the conviction, the carpenter argued that the use of cell-site location information gathered by the FBI as evidence violated the 14th Amendment of the Constitution of America which safeguards the rights of privacy for the people (Fonzone et al., 2018). While employing the Sixth Circuit, the court dismissed his appeal holding that the accused did not have a judicious expectation to privacy in locating data as gathered by the FBI given that he had already collectively shared it with the wireless carriers. Therefore, he was not entitled to the protection of the Fourth Amendment.

Later Decision overview

The question is to whether obtaining of the cell phone location record established an exploration with an aim of the 14th Amendment, and whether it was constitutional. While interpreting on the principles of the Fourth Amendment in respect of the developing surveillance technology (Fonzone et al., 2018). Through this approach, the court noted that while its focus on the digital data did fit in the existing precedents as it were in the case of Boyd vs United States, 116 U. S. 616, 630 (1886), when addressing the expectation of an individual on privacy in terms of physical position and movement. The court highlighted the privacy concerns that were inherent in the case and noted that tracking of the cellphone positioning using the CSIL presented some privacy concerns.

Conclusion

While rejecting the government’s application, the court commented that the government was not simply questioning for a straight forward submission of the 3rd-doctrine, but a momentous extension of it to diverse categories of data. Accordingly, the court ruled that accessing of the individual’s cellphone location data was an unconstitutional search and therefore, a violation of the Fourth Amendment. Besides, the search fell short of the standard required by the probable cause.

References

Fonzone, C.C., Heinzelman, K., & Roberts, M.R. (2018). Carpenter v. United States: A Revolution in Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence? 4(9), 1-19.

Report by Case 1

Submission date: 28-Mar-2019 02:14AM (UTC-0400) Submission ID: 1101263610 File name: Carpenter_Vs._United_States.docx (20.95K) Word count: 562 Character count: 3141

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3% STUDENT PAPERS

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Report ORIGINALITY REPORT

PRIMARY SOURCES

Submitted to Tiff in University Student Paper

www.chanrobles.com Internet Source

  • Report
    • by Case 1
  • Report
    • ORIGINALITY REPORT
    • PRIMARY SOURCES

Case Summary

How to Handle a Risky Business

Facts: ​Chelsea Hamill attended Camp Cheley for three years. Before attending

camp each summer her parents signed a liability/risk release form. In July 2004,

when Hamill was 15 years old, she fell off a Cheley horse and broke her arm.

Chelsea brought a negligence and gross negligence lawsuit against the summer

camp. Hamill’s mother testified at her deposition that she voluntarily signed the

release after having “skimmed” it. At her deposition, the mother testified as

follows:

Attorney

And, you know, you knew that someone such as Christopher Reeve had been

tragically injured falling off a horse?

Ms. Hamill

Yes.

Attorney

Did you personally know Mr. Reeve?

Ms. Hamill

Yes.

Attorney

And so you were aware that there were significant risks associated with

horseback riding?

Ms. Hamill

Yes.

Attorney

And you were aware that your daughter was going to be doing a significant

amount of horseback riding?

Ms. Hamill

Yes.

Hamill’s mother’s interpretation of the release was that prospective negligent

claims were not waived. The camp disagreed. The release stated in part:

I, on behalf of myself and my child, hereby release and waive any claim of

liability against Cheley … occurring to my child while he/she

participates in any and all camp programs and activities.

I give my permission for my child to participate in all camp activities,

including those described above. I acknowledge and assume the risks

involved in these activities, and for any damages, illness, injury or death

… resulting from such risks for myself and my child.

(Emphasis Added.)

Decision: ​Judgment for Camp Cheley. The release did not need to include an

exhaustive list of particularized injury scenarios to be effective. Hamill’s mother

had more than sufficient information to allow her to assess the extent of injury

possible in horseback riding and to make an “informed” decision before signing the

release. The mother was informed of the intent to release “all claims,” including

prospective negligence claims. While exculpatory agreements are not a bar to civil

liability for gross negligence, the record is devoid of evidence of gross negligence.

[Hamill v. Cheley Colorado Camps, Inc., 262 P.3d 945 (Colo. App. 2011)]

1. Business Continuity Plan

Explore the “Business Continuity Plan” template located on the Ready Business website. 

http://www.ready.gov/sites/default/files/documents/files/BusinessContinuityPlan.pdf

2. NFPA 1600: Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs

Read “NFPA 1600: Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs,” located on the National Fire Protection Association website. 

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/document-information-pages?mode=code&code=1600

3. Preparedness Planning for Your Business

Read “Preparedness Planning for Your Business,” located on the Ready.gov website.

http://www.ready.gov/business

4. Protecting Your Businesses

Read “Protecting Your Businesses,” located on the FEMA website. Explore the resources included on this page. 

https://www.fema.gov/protecting-your-businesses

5. The Voluntary Private Sector Preparedness

Read “The Voluntary Private Sector Preparedness Program–PS-Prep & Small Business Preparedness,” located on the FEMA website. 

https://www.fema.gov/voluntary-private-sector-preparedness-program-ps-preptm-small-business-preparedness

Business Continuity Planning Before/After A Disaster

1 Unsatisfactory 0.00%2 Less than Satisfactory 65.00%3 Satisfactory 75.00%4 Good 85.00%5 Excellent 100.00%
70.0 %Content
10.0 %Determines Business’s Legal Obligations and Resources Available for Disaster PreparednessThe plan does not identify a business’s legal obligations and resources available for disaster preparedness.The plan identifies a business’s legal obligations and resources available for disaster preparedness, but lacks details or is incomplete.The plan identifies a business’s legal obligations and resources available for disaster preparedness. There is mention of the federal, state, and local community?s guidelines and resources available to the community after a disaster.The plan identifies a business’s legal obligations and resources available for disaster preparedness. There is a detailed explanation of the federal, state, and local community?s guidelines and resources available to the community after a disaster.The plan identifies a business’s legal obligations and resources available for disaster preparedness. There is a detailed explanation of the federal, state, and local community?s guidelines and resources available to the community after a disaster. Financial resources available to support small businesses in their efforts to plan for disaster and to assist them during recovery are included.
20.0 %Develops a Business Continuity Operations PlanThe plan does not include a business continuity operations plan.The plan includes a business continuity operations plan, but lacks details or is incomplete.The plan includes a business continuity operations plan. The plan mentions the business?s legal obligations, communication plans, and collaboration efforts with emergency responders during the response and recovery process. The plan includes decisions for suspending and continuing business operations in the case of a disaster.The plan includes a business continuity operations plan. The plan provides a detailed description of the business?s legal obligations, communication plans, and collaboration efforts with emergency responders during the response and recovery process. The plan includes decisions for suspending or continuing business operations in the case of a disaster with a justification for each potential option.The plan includes a business continuity operations plan. The plan provides a detailed description of the business?s legal obligations, communication plans, and collaboration efforts with emergency responders during the response and recovery process. The plan includes decisions for suspending and continuing business operations in the case of a disaster with a justification for each potential option. In the event the business is suspended, the plan includes challenges that may arise with communication during the disaster and possible solutions for communicating with business employees, emergency responders, and the community.
20.0 %Determines How Business Will Return to Normal FunctionsThe plan does not include strategies for returning the business to normal functions after a disaster.The plan includes strategies for returning the business to normal functions after a disaster, but lacks details or is incomplete.The plan includes strategies for returning the business to normal functions after a disaster.The plan includes strategies for returning the business to normal functions after a disaster. The plan provides solutions surrounding a given disaster that support the return of business functions.The plan includes two or more strategies for returning the business to normal functions after a disaster. The plan provides solutions surrounding a given disaster that support the return of business functions. There are challenges included that the business owner may face, and possible solutions to handle the challenges and continue business operations.
20.0 %Identifies Federal, State, and Local Resources Available for Business ContinuityThe plan does not identify federal, state, and local resources available for business continuity.The plan includes federal, state, and local resources available for business continuity, but lacks details or is incomplete.The plan includes federal, state, and local resources available to ensure business continuity after a disaster.The plan includes one federal, one state, and one local resource available to ensure business continuity after a disaster. There is mention of how the plans align to federal, state, and local recommendations.The plan includes at least one federal, one state, and one local resource available to ensure business continuity after a disaster. There is a clear explanation of how the plans align to federal, state, and local recommendations and how these resources will ensure business continuity after a disaster.
20.0 %Organizations and Effectiveness
7.0 % Thesis Development and PurposePaper lacks any discernible overall purpose or organizing claim.Thesis and/or main claim are insufficiently developed and/or vague; purpose is not clear.Thesis and/or main claim are apparent and appropriate to purpose.Thesis and/or main claim are clear and forecast the development of the paper. It is descriptive and reflective of the arguments and appropriate to the purpose.Thesis and/or main claim are comprehensive. The essence of the paper is contained within the thesis. Thesis statement makes the purpose of the paper clear.
8.0 % Argument Logic and ConstructionStatement of purpose is not justified by the conclusion. The conclusion does not support the claim made. Argument is incoherent and uses noncredible sources.Sufficient justification of claims is lacking. Argument lacks consistent unity. There are obvious flaws in the logic. Some sources have questionable credibility.Argument is orderly, but may have a few inconsistencies. The argument presents minimal justification of claims. Argument logically, but not thoroughly, supports the purpose. Sources used are credible. Introduction and conclusion bracket the thesis.Argument shows logical progression. Techniques of argumentation are evident. There is a smooth progression of claims from introduction to conclusion. Most sources are authoritative.Clear and convincing argument presents a persuasive claim in a distinctive and compelling manner. All sources are authoritative.
5.0 %Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, language use)Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice and/or sentence construction are used.Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) and/or word choice are present. Sentence structure is correct but not varied.Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader. Correct and varied sentence structure and audience-appropriate language are employed.Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of effective sentence structures and figures of speech.Writer is clearly in command of standard, written, academic English.
10.0 %Format
5.0 % Paper Format (use of appropriate style for the major and assignment)Template is not used appropriately, or documentation format is rarely followed correctly.Appropriate template is used, but some elements are missing or mistaken. A lack of control with formatting is apparent.Appropriate template is used. Formatting is correct, although some minor errors may be present.Appropriate template is fully used. There are virtually no errors in formatting style.All format elements are correct.
5.0 % Research Citations (in-text citations for paraphrasing and direct quotes, and reference page listing and formatting, as appropriate to assignment and style)No reference page is included. No citations are used.Reference page is present. Citations are inconsistently used.Reference page is included and lists sources used in the paper. Sources are appropriately documented, although some errors may be present.Reference page is present and fully inclusive of all cited sources. Documentation is appropriate and citation style is usually correct.In-text citations and a reference page are complete and correct. The documentation of cited sources is free of error.
100 % Total Weightage 

Business Continuity Plan

ready.gov/business

Company Name Address

Telephone Last Revision Date

Program Administration •Define the scope, objectives, and assumptions of the business continuity plan.

Business Continuity Organization Define the roles and responsibilities for team members. Identify the lines of authority, succession of management, and delegation of authority. Address interaction with external organizations including contractors and vendors.

Figure 1. Example Business Continuity Team Organization Chart

-1-

Business Continuity Plan

ready.gov/business

Team (IT, Production, Member Name Email Work Telephone Home / Cell Telephone

Support)

Business Impact Analysis •Insert results of Business Impact Analysis •Identify Recovery Time Objectives for business processes and information technology •Identify Recovery Point Objective for data restoration

Business Continuity Strategies & Requirements •Insert detailed procedures, resource requirements, and logistics for execution of all recovery strategies •Insert detailed procedures, resource requirements, and logistics for relocation to alternate worksites •Insert detailed procedures, resource requirements, and data restoration plan for the recovery of information technology (networks and required connectivity, servers, desktop/laptops, wireless devices, applications, and data)

-2-

Business Continuity Plan

ready.gov/business

Manual Workarounds • Document all forms and resource requirements for all manual workarounds

Incident Management

Define procedures: • Incident detection and reporting • Alerting and notifications • Business continuity plan activation • Emergency operations center activation • Damage assessment (coordination with emergency response plan) and situation analysis • Development and approval of an incident action plan

Training, Testing & Exercising • Training curriculum for business continuity team members • Testing schedule, procedures, and forms for business recovery strategies and information technology recovery strategies • Orientation, tabletop, and full-scale exercises

Program Maintenance and Improvement • Schedule, triggers, and assignments for the periodic review of the business continuity and IT disaster recovery plan • Details of corrective action program to address deficiencies

Appendix

References to Related Policies & Procedures • Emergency Response Plan • Information Technology Disaster Recovery Plan (if not included in the business continuity plan) • Crisis Communications Plan • Employee Assistance Plan

-3-

Business Continuity Plan

ready.gov/business

Vendors & Contractors

Company Contact Name Emergency Business Telephone Telephone

Revision History

Revision No. Date Description of Changes Authorization

Plan Distribution & Access

The Plan will be distributed to members of the business continuity team and management. A master copy of the document should be maintained by the business continuity team leader. Provide print copies of this plan within the room designated as the emergency operations center (EOC). Multiple copies should be stored within the EOC to ensure that team members can quickly review roles, responsibilities, tasks, and reference information when the team is activated.

An electronic copy of this plan should be stored on a secure and accessible website that would allow team member access if company servers are down.

Electronic copies should also be stored on a secure USB flash drive for printing on demand.

-4-

  1. Last Revision Date:
  2. Team IT Production SupportRow1:
  3. Member NameRow1:
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  53. Member NameRow11:
  54. EmailRow11:
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  104. Emergency TelephoneRow1:
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  175. Company Telephone:
  176. Company Address: